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Useful Temperate Plants

Acacia leucoclada

Tindale

Fabaceae


Classification of the genus Acacia (in the wider sense) has been subject to considerable debate. It is generally agreed that there are valid reasons for breaking it up into several distinct genera, but there has been disagreement over the way this should be done. As of 2017, it is widely (but not completely) accepted that the section that includes the majority of the Australian species (including this one) should retain the name Acacia, whilst other sections of the genus should be transferred to the genera Acaciella, Mariosousa, Senegalia and Vachellia[
K
Title
Plants for a Future
Author
Ken Fern
Description
Notes from observations, tasting etc at Plants For A Future and on field trips.
].

+ Synonyms

Racosperma leucoclada (Tindale) Pedley

Common Name:

No Image.

General Information

Acacia leucoclada is sometimes a shrub growing around 2.5 - 4 metres tall, but more commonly becoming a tree; it usually grows up to 10 metres tall, reaching 20 metres in favoured situations, especially in the north of its range (subspecies argentifolia)[
286
Title
Flora of Australia
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.anbg.gov.au/abrs/abif/flora/
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
The full information from the Flora of Australia - on-line. An excellent resource.
,
1301
Title
Acacia Search; Evaluation of Acacia as a woody crop option for Southern Australia
Publication
 
Author
Maslin B.R. & McDonald M.W.
Publisher
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation; Western A
Year
2004
ISBN
0642 58585 7
Description
 
]. The single trunk often divides into two main stems at around 2 - 7 metres tall, the straight boles being around 13 - 45cm in diameter. In shady situations the plants develop a rather spindly growth habit (with stems straight and erect), often freely suckering and forming pure stands[
1301
Title
Acacia Search; Evaluation of Acacia as a woody crop option for Southern Australia
Publication
 
Author
Maslin B.R. & McDonald M.W.
Publisher
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation; Western A
Year
2004
ISBN
0642 58585 7
Description
 
]. Unlike most Australian species of Acacia, this species retains its true foliage into maturity and does not produce phyllodes[
286
Title
Flora of Australia
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.anbg.gov.au/abrs/abif/flora/
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
The full information from the Flora of Australia - on-line. An excellent resource.
].
Acacia leucoclada is regarded as having good prospects as a crop plant for high volume wood production[
1301
Title
Acacia Search; Evaluation of Acacia as a woody crop option for Southern Australia
Publication
 
Author
Maslin B.R. & McDonald M.W.
Publisher
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation; Western A
Year
2004
ISBN
0642 58585 7
Description
 
]. It is also grown as a pioneer species for establishing native woodland and can be used in shelterbelts and in soil stabilization projects.

Known Hazards

Especially in times of drought, many Acacia species can concentrate high levels of the toxin Hydrogen cyanide in their foliage, making them dangerous for herbivores to eat.

Botanical References

286
Title
Flora of Australia
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.anbg.gov.au/abrs/abif/flora/
Publisher
 
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
The full information from the Flora of Australia - on-line. An excellent resource.

Range

Australia - New South Wales, southeastern Queensland

Habitat

Open forest, usually in association with eucalypts and Callitris species, in poor sandy or gravelly soils, often on basalt or acid granite

Properties

Medicinal Rating *  *
Other Uses Rating *  *  *
HabitTree
Height10.00 m
Growth RateFast
PollinatorsInsects
Cultivation StatusCultivated

Cultivation Details

Acacia leucoclada grows in semi-arid to sub-humid areas of the temperate to subtropical zone of eastern Australia where it can be found at elevations up to 780 metres. It grows best in areas where the mean maximum temperature of the hottest months can reach 29 - 34°c, and the mean minimum in the coldest month can fall to 0 - 3°c. The plant can often experience moderate frosts, down to around -5°c for short periods. Mean annual rainfall can vary from 250 - 875mm, with a variable dry season that can range from 0 - 6 months[
1301
Title
Acacia Search; Evaluation of Acacia as a woody crop option for Southern Australia
Publication
 
Author
Maslin B.R. & McDonald M.W.
Publisher
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation; Western A
Year
2004
ISBN
0642 58585 7
Description
 
].
Requires a sunny position for best growth, often found in shady positions but then usually a spindly shrub[
1301
Title
Acacia Search; Evaluation of Acacia as a woody crop option for Southern Australia
Publication
 
Author
Maslin B.R. & McDonald M.W.
Publisher
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation; Western A
Year
2004
ISBN
0642 58585 7
Description
 
].
A fast-growing tree when young[, probably living for several decades1301].
In one trial, in an area with around 600mm annual rainfall, this species showed good form, attained 5.6 metres in height and 7.2cm in diameter, at the age of 30 months[
1301
Title
Acacia Search; Evaluation of Acacia as a woody crop option for Southern Australia
Publication
 
Author
Maslin B.R. & McDonald M.W.
Publisher
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation; Western A
Year
2004
ISBN
0642 58585 7
Description
 
].
The plant can sucker freely, but is unlikely to respond well to coppicing[
1301
Title
Acacia Search; Evaluation of Acacia as a woody crop option for Southern Australia
Publication
 
Author
Maslin B.R. & McDonald M.W.
Publisher
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation; Western A
Year
2004
ISBN
0642 58585 7
Description
 
]. Prefers a well-drained soil, succeeding in light to moderately heavy conditions[
1301
Title
Acacia Search; Evaluation of Acacia as a woody crop option for Southern Australia
Publication
 
Author
Maslin B.R. & McDonald M.W.
Publisher
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation; Western A
Year
2004
ISBN
0642 58585 7
Description
 
]. At least some forms have shown themselves to be drought-tolerant[
1301
Title
Acacia Search; Evaluation of Acacia as a woody crop option for Southern Australia
Publication
 
Author
Maslin B.R. & McDonald M.W.
Publisher
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation; Western A
Year
2004
ISBN
0642 58585 7
Description
 
].
This species has in the past been confused with Acacia dealbata, but differs in various aspects, including its more open growth habit[
1301
Title
Acacia Search; Evaluation of Acacia as a woody crop option for Southern Australia
Publication
 
Author
Maslin B.R. & McDonald M.W.
Publisher
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation; Western A
Year
2004
ISBN
0642 58585 7
Description
 
].
This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria; these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[
755
Title
Nodulation Plants in GRIN Taxonomy
Publication
 
Author
 
Website
http://www.ars-grin.gov/~sbmljw/cgi-bin/taxnodul.pl?language=en
Publisher
United States Department of Agriculture
Year
0
ISBN
 
Description
An online database listing plants that have either positive or negative reports on root and stem nodulation with nitrogen-fixing bacteria.
].

Edible Uses

None known

Medicinal

The bark of all Acacia species contains greater or lesser quantities of tannins and are astringent. Astringents are often used medicinally - taken internally, for example. they are used in the treatment of diarrhoea and dysentery, and can also be helpful in cases of internal bleeding. Applied externally, often as a wash, they are used to treat wounds and other skin problems, haemorrhoids, perspiring feet, some eye problems, as a mouth wash etc[
601
Title
The Useful Native Plants of Australia.
Publication
 
Author
Maiden J.H.
Website
http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org
Publisher
Turner & Co.; London.
Year
1889
ISBN
 
Description
Terse details of the uses of many Australian plants and other species naturalised, or at least growing, in Australia. It can be downloaded from the Internet.
,
K
Title
Plants for a Future
Author
Ken Fern
Description
Notes from observations, tasting etc at Plants For A Future and on field trips.
].
Many Acacia trees also yield greater or lesser quantities of a gum from the trunk and stems. This is sometimes taken internally in the treatment of diarrhoea and haemorrhoids[
601
Title
The Useful Native Plants of Australia.
Publication
 
Author
Maiden J.H.
Website
http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org
Publisher
Turner & Co.; London.
Year
1889
ISBN
 
Description
Terse details of the uses of many Australian plants and other species naturalised, or at least growing, in Australia. It can be downloaded from the Internet.
].

Agroforestry Uses:

A useful windbreak species , it also provides excellent gully erosion control on account of its fast growth rate, vigorous suckering habit and propensity to form thickets[
1301
Title
Acacia Search; Evaluation of Acacia as a woody crop option for Southern Australia
Publication
 
Author
Maslin B.R. & McDonald M.W.
Publisher
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation; Western A
Year
2004
ISBN
0642 58585 7
Description
 
].
The tree is a natural pioneer, invading cleared farmland within its native range. It is an ideal 'nurse crop' for use with slow growing eucalypts species or other long-lived species in mixed woodlots[1301.

Other Uses

The small core of heartwood is pale brown; the sapwood is white. It is a potential source of small round timbers for use as posts, poles or rails[
1301
Title
Acacia Search; Evaluation of Acacia as a woody crop option for Southern Australia
Publication
 
Author
Maslin B.R. & McDonald M.W.
Publisher
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation; Western A
Year
2004
ISBN
0642 58585 7
Description
 
]. Although this species produces pulp yields within the range of commercial pulpwoods its level of brightness (upon bleaching) is below standard[
1301
Title
Acacia Search; Evaluation of Acacia as a woody crop option for Southern Australia
Publication
 
Author
Maslin B.R. & McDonald M.W.
Publisher
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation; Western A
Year
2004
ISBN
0642 58585 7
Description
 
].
The wood is likely to make a good fuel and a good charcoal[
1301
Title
Acacia Search; Evaluation of Acacia as a woody crop option for Southern Australia
Publication
 
Author
Maslin B.R. & McDonald M.W.
Publisher
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation; Western A
Year
2004
ISBN
0642 58585 7
Description
 
].

Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a sunny position in a warm greenhouse[
1
Title
RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956
Publication
 
Author
F. Chittendon.
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Year
1951
ISBN
-
Description
Comprehensive listing of species and how to grow them. Somewhat outdated, it has been replaced in 1992 by a new dictionary (see [200]).
].The dried seed of most, if not all, members of this genus has a hard seedcoat and may benefit from scarification before sowing to speed up germination. This can usually be done by pouring a small amount of nearly boiling water on the seeds (being careful not to cook them!) and then soaking them for 12 - 24 hours in warm water. By this time they should have imbibed moisture and swollen - if they have not, then carefully make a nick in the seedcoat (being careful not to damage the embryo) and soak for a further 12 hours before sowing. Sow the seed in Spring in a greenhouse. As soon as the seedlings are large enough to handle, prick them out into individual pots and grow them on in a sunny position in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts, and consider giving them some protection from the cold for their first winter outdoors.
Acacia seeds that have matured fully on the bush and have been properly dried have a hard seed coat and can be stored in closed containers without deterioration for 5 - 10 years or more in dry conditions at ambient temperatures. It is best to remove the aril, which attracts weevils and can lead to moulds forming. The arils are easilyremoved by placing the seeds in water and rubbing them between the hands, then drying the seeds and winnowing them[
1294
Title
Potential of Australian Acacias in combating hunger in semi-arid lands
Publication
Conservation Science W. Aust. 4 (3):161-169 (2002)
Author
Rinaudo A.; Patel P.; Thomson L.A.J.
Publisher
 
Year
2002
ISBN
 
Description
 
].
Cite as: Temperate Plants Database, Ken Fern. temperate.theferns.info. 2018-08-19. <temperate.theferns.info/plant/Acacia+leucoclada>

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